Life Marriage & Family Religious Liberty


Pro-life Progress

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Great news.

Starting today and thanks to a Federal District Court seeing through a last ditch effort by Planned Parenthood to stop it, several common sense health and safety standards are now in effect that further protect women and preborn children from the dangerous and deadly practices of the abortion industry.

Cathi memeCAP President Cathi Herrod put it best: “When Planned Parenthood loses, women win.”

Sponsored by Senator Kimberly Yee and signed into law in 2012 as part of the Mother’s Health and Safety Act, these standards require that:

  • The abortion pill must be dispensed in line with Federal Food and Drug Administration protocol, which requires the pill only be dispensed in the first seven weeks of a pregnancy. Currently, abortion providers such as Planned Parenthood ignore this protocol and distribute the abortion pill through nine weeks.
  • Doctors who perform surgical abortions must have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the abortion clinic.
  • Any time an ambulance is needed at an abortion clinic, the incident must be reported to the Arizona Department of Health Services.
  • Signs must be posted in abortion clinics informing women that it is illegal for anyone to coerce them into having an abortion.

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Summer Internship Opportunities!

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

Interning with CAP provides students with real-life experience working in public policy. See the two descriptions below and email us at intern@azpolicy.org with any questions.

Policy Intern Overview

Program Goal – The Internship Program at Center for Arizona Policy (CAP) provides students the opportunity to gain first-hand experience in nonprofit government relations and participate in the daily operations of a policy organization. Students will work closely with the policy team to develop educational materials for the public and learn the philosophy behind and methodology of implementing pro-family public policies.

Terms of the Program – Internships demand 15-25 hours each week and are typically offered for the spring, fall, and summer semesters. Daytime availability is a must. College credit is available but the intern is responsible for making the appropriate arrangement with his or her college. Internships do not include compensation.

Internship Duties – The intern works primarily in the policy, research, and grassroots divisions of Center for Arizona Policy. The intern will attend seminars and committee hearings as needed, assist with policy-related projects, and complete research projects as assigned. Additionally, the intern will assist with various administrative tasks in other areas of the organization.

Qualifications – Applicants must:

  • Be enrolled in college either at the undergraduate or graduate level.
  • Exhibit a basic understanding of the legislative process.
  • Exhibit computer competency in Excel, Word, Outlook, and web-based research.
  • Have strong written and oral skills.
  • Have access to transportation.

To apply, email your resume, a writing sample, an unofficial college transcript, and the name, position and contact information for two references to intern@azpolicy.org and put “Policy Intern Application” in the subject line.

Communications Intern Overview

Program Goal – The Communications Internship Program at Center for Arizona Policy (CAP) provides students the opportunity to gain first-hand experience in communications and public relations for a nonprofit public policy organization. Students will be a part of the team responsible for communicating CAP’s mission and message to promote and defend foundational principles in the press, online, and at events.

Terms of the Program – Internships require 15-25 hours each week and are typically offered for the spring, fall, and summer semesters. Daytime availability is a must. College credit is available but the intern is responsible for making the appropriate arrangement with his or her college. Internships do not include compensation.

Internship Duties – The intern works primarily in the communications, marketing, and public relations divisions of Center for Arizona Policy. The internship will be writing intensive, as interns will assist with creating content for CAP’s Foundations blog, weekly emails to CAP’s statewide list, talking points for media interviews, op-eds, letters to the editor, as well as doing research projects and much more.

Interns will also be responsible for monitoring local and national media for coverage on CAP’s issue of life, marriage and family, religious liberty, and judicial reform. This will include monitoring activity on social networks like Facebook and Twitter.

Additionally, depending on the intern’s familiarity with audio and video editing software, interns will assist in recording and editing Public Service Announcements and online content. The intern will assist with various administrative tasks in other areas of the organization as well.

Qualifications – Applicants must:

  • Be enrolled in college either at the undergraduate or graduate level.
  • Exhibit a basic understanding of the legislative process.
  • Exhibit computer competency in Excel, Word, Outlook, and web-based research.
  • Be well acquainted with the Associated Press stylebook.
  • Have strong written and oral skills.
  • Have access to transportation.

To apply, email your resume, a writing sample, an unofficial college transcript, and the name, position and contact information for two references to intern@azpolicy.org and put “Communications Intern Application” in the subject line.

“All of us believe that many criticisms of the Arizona bill are deeply misleading.”

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

As CAP President Cathi Herrod said:

The attacks on SB 1062 show politics at its absolute worse. They represent precisely why so many people are sick of the modern political debate. Instead of having an honest discussion about the true meaning of religious liberty, opponents of the bill have hijacked this discussion through lies, personal attacks, and irresponsible reporting.

The truth about SB 1062 is much more simple. Please take a moment to read this letter sent to Governor Brewer from University of Virginia School of Law Professor Douglas Laycock and 10 other law professors, imploring the Governor to “make [her] decision on the basis of accurate information” and not on egregious misrepresentations made by critics.

The letter says:

 “Some of us are Republicans; some of us are Democrats. Some of us are religious; some of us are not. Some of us oppose same-sex marriage; some of us support it. Nine of the eleven signers of this letter believe that you should sign the bill; two are unsure. But all of us believe that many criticisms of the Arizona bill are deeply misleading.”

Planned Parenthood and the Tempe School District

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Parents always have the right to protect their children from exposure to sexual materials in school. It’s important for families to be vigilant, especially when their school district is choosing curriculum.

On January 7, a Planned Parenthood representative presented three different sexual education curricula to the Tempe School Board.

Thankfully, families across the East Valley heard about this presentation and turned out to make their voices heard in this discussion, causing the Tempe School Board to wait before deciding which curriculum to choose.

While this was a victory for the day, the fight is far from over, as the school board will be having another meeting to hear two more curriculum options on Tuesday, February 4 at 4:30 p.m. at Desert Vista High School’s Media Center.

It is critical that as many people turn out as possible to ensure Planned Parenthood’s pro-abortion agenda isn’t allowed to influence the school board’s decision. For more information on how you can get involved, contact Peggy McClain.

Read more about this issue on The Policy Pages.

Nothing but “Cover”

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Following the U.S. Senate’s passage of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA), some, including Arizona Senator John McCain, have pointed to the adoption of the amendment put forward by Senator Rob Portman as evidence that the religious exemption in the bill was “beefed up” or amended to more fully protect religious freedom under the bill. Nothing could be further from the truth.

The Portman Amendment, available here (subsection (b) on pages 10-11), does nothing to expand the religious exemption under ENDA, and it merely says that those originally exempt under the bill (basically only churches) cannot be penalized by the government. The amendment does nothing to protect business owners and employers with sincerely held religious beliefs, and it is likely this amendment was a way for some senators to gain “cover” for voting yes for ENDA. As a sign that the Portman Amendment was meaningless, it was reported that LGBT advocates from the Human Rights Campaign as well as the ACLU quickly stated they did not oppose the amendment, saying that it was an unnecessary provision.

In contrast to the Portman Amendment, Senator Pat Toomey offered a much more meaningful amendment to expand the protections in the religious exemption, see Senator Toomey’s amendment here. Although Senators McCain and Flake both voted for the Toomey Amendment, after the amendment failed to be adopted, both Arizona Senators voted for the final passage of ENDA nonetheless.

One other important point: some have said that ENDA’s religious exemption can be strengthened in the House of Representatives, yet this seems highly unlikely. In fact, as an example of the growing disdain by some and lack of respect for religious liberty, backers of ENDA would prefer to completely eliminate the religious exemption, as this New York Times editorial says.

ENDA is bad public policy and threatens the religious freedom rights of every American.