Life Marriage & Family Religious Liberty


BREAKING NEWS: Governor Brewer Sued For Declaring “Arizona Day of Prayer”

Posted in Religious Liberty on: March 16th, 2011
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The Freedom From Religion Foundation filed a lawsuit in federal court yesterday against Governor Jan Brewer for declaring on May 6, 2010, the “Arizona Day of Prayer.” Governor Brewer issued the declaration in conjunction with President Barack Obama and elected leaders across the country respecting the National Day of Prayer.

Millions of Americans and thousands of local leaders have traditionally prayed for the nation and its leaders during the annual event, which was codified by Congress in 1952.

“The First Amendment and the Arizona Constitution allow public officials to acknowledge our nation’s religious heritage,” said Cathi Herrod, President of Center for Arizona Policy (CAP). “The Freedom From Religion Foundation’s claims that Gov. Brewer’s actions are suddenly unconstitutional are a radical misinterpretation of the First Amendment.”

CAP has been actively involved in defending the National Day of Prayer. In June, they joined family policy councils across the country in filing a friend-of-the-court brief supporting the National Day of Prayer in the Freedom From Religion Foundation v Obama district court case.

“At a time of economic crisis and a historic budgetary shortfall, it is absolutely appropriate and prudent for our elected officials to call for prayer,” said Herrod.

Congress and President Harry Truman instituted the National Day of Prayer in 1952 in a joint resolution. In 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed an amendment specifying that the annual event would be observed on “the first Thursday in May each year.”

 

Posted by Aaron Baer

Aaron is the Communications Director at Center for Arizona Policy. He is continually amazed by the revelation of truth found in the gospel. While he anxiously awaits seeing Christ return in His glory, Aaron roots for the Chicago Cubs in their quest to win the World Series. He is unsure which will come first.


3 Responses

  1. Bob Grinnell says:

    Is it
    “The Freedom of Religion”
    Or is it
    “The Freedom From Religion”
    Do you really know?

    Many want it the latter and regardless of the First Amendment text states. If many of us are left out of the Day of Prayer then why are we all required to respect the daily prayer times of some other religions in the United States of America? There are some allowed to take time out during the day for prayer like those that get time to go outside and smoke and get paid for it. It looks like some of us are being discriminated against.

    1st Amendment – Ratified 12/15/1791
    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

    Look, unlike the many Bible versions written, the Constitution of the United States of America, including the all of the amendments must remain as written, get it. The 1st amendment does not say freedom FROM religion it is freedom OF religion. You can choose to not belong to any religion, that is your constitutional right but you may not keep those that prefer to follow their God whoever they believe Him (or her) to be, (period).

    Maybe this country needs to get back to its roots and keep God in the foreground. I grew up with the US Flag in the schoolroom and we said the pledge with “under God” in it. It was not a prayer then and it is not a prayer now. I will bet many of you do not know why those words were added (see below), or look it up yourself and be proud. I want to point out that you will not see any reference to removing the flag or not saying the pledge because it offends someone. How week we are to give in to something like that. If we were to go to another country, would they give into one individual’s objection? In some countries, they might shoot you for wanting a privilege like that.

    I went to a state run high school where we read from the bible every day. If someone did not want to read, they did not have to and nothing was ever said. There was not any Freedom From Religion organization to make an issue about something that everyone was OK with. We had the 1st amendment back then also, it said the same as it does today but for some reason it is a very terrible thing.

    What’s up with this?
    The Freedom FROM Religion Foundation filed a lawsuit in federal court yesterday against Governor Jan Brewer for declaring on May 6, 2010, the “Arizona Day of Prayer.” Governor Brewer issued the declaration in conjunction with President Barack Obama and elected leaders across the country respecting the National Day of Prayer.

    Millions of Americans and thousands of local leaders have traditionally prayed for the nation and its leaders during the annual event, which was codified by Congress in 1952.

    So why didn’t they file a lawsuit against Obama and all of the others?

    Note:
    When and Why was under God added to the Pledge of Allegiance

    1892 “I pledge allegiance to my flag and the republic for which it stands: one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all.”
    1892 to 1923 “I pledge allegiance to my flag and to the republic for which it stands: one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all.”
    1923 to 1924 “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States and to the republic for which it stands: one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all.”
    1924 to 1954 “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands; one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all.”
    1954 to Present “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

    The Pledge of Allegiance of the United States is an oath of loyalty to the national flag and the republic of the United States of America, originally composed by Francis Bellamy in 1892. The Pledge has been modified four times since then, with the most recent change adding the words “under God” in 1954. Congressional sessions open with the swearing of the Pledge, as do government meetings at local levels, meetings held by the Knights of Columbus, Royal Rangers, Boy Scouts of America, Girl Scouts of the USA, Fraternal Order of Eagles, Freemasons, Toastmasters International and their concordant bodies, as well as other organizations.

    Why?
    In 1954, during the McCarthy era and communism scare, Congress passed a bill, which was signed into law, to add the words “under God” to show that we are a country that believes in God as communism does not believe in God.

    The current Pledge reads:

    “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands; one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

    The Pledge of Allegiance reads:

    I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. According to the United States Flag Code, the Pledge “should be rendered by standing at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. Members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present and not in uniform may render the military salute. Persons in uniform should remain silent, face the flag, and render the military salute”.

  2. Allyson says:

    Thanks for trying to describe the terminlogy for the inexperienced persons!

  3. Missy says:

    Despicable! Another frivolousness group suing our Governor at the drop of a hat, at every turn of events. This is just another excuse to bombard an effective & valuable Governor!!

    The legal precedence for our national and state leaders to designate a Day of Prayer is so well established that legislative efforts to prevent have failed miserably. Lawsuits in other states have failed miserably! Does this stop the attempts…NO. Why? Because the ungodly hate the godly!

    Sad that another attempt is being made to find that atheist judge to overturn legal precedence, but that’s exactly what this is about. Judges are NOT supposed to legislate from the bench but these people are really hoping they can find one who will.

    As pointed out already, the US Constitution states Freedom OF Religion. That include the religion of atheism. If they don’t like prayer, then don’t pray. The beauty of our Freedom OF Religion is that nobody is making them!

    Atheists, the minority by far, should be appreciative that they are not forced into practicing in public a religion they don’t want. They are protected from this happening by our Constitution. However, that same protection is in place for we who don’t want to be forced to practice the religion of atheism in public!

    I submit that on this National Day of Prayer those who want to pray in public should pray that our Freedom’s to do so are not be taken away!

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